SHORT PAPER ASSIGNMENT

An enormous staircase winds up towards the old, huge mansion. Thunder and lightning crack through the sky. You flash-back to your bosses, the hiring partners of the Jamm & Louis law firm. There they are, slapping fives and laughing to each other as they hand you your first assignment as an associate lawyer.

And you thought they were laughing WITH you.

But, you think, all young lawyers have to do their grunt work. Gotta work my way up in the world. You march up the stairs ready to meet your first client.

You march up the stairs, briefcase in hand and optimism in your heart. The door creaks open slowly, which is strange--because you can't remember knocking or ringing the doorbell. Must be the jet lag.

After all, you've just stepped off a plane after an eight hour flight, from New York to Creepivania, a small eastern European nation, situated between...come to think of it, you couldn't locate it on a world map if someone asked you. Well, thank goodness for modern transportation. You're here to meet with Jamm's newest client, Ludwig Von Nosferstat. What you know about him is that he is C.E.O. of CuttySharp Cutlery (a Creepivania-based knife manufacturer), and he is seeking U.S. legal counsel.

"Ha-HAA! Velcome!" You are surprised to hear such a booming voice come from such a withered, pale figure. He looks like he's at least 104 years old. "Come in, my young friend. May I offer you some refreshments? Cranberry Juice? V-8? Kool-Aid? My favorite flavor is of course..."

"Red?" you reply without thinking.

"Ha, ha HAAA! How is it they say, 'Great minds think alike?' I'm quite excited to get started suing people."

"Well," you reply, "I have been briefed on CuttySharp, but I'd like to ask you a few que..."

"Ahh yes, the American Legal System...a thing of wonder. First, I will require a copy of the Code of American Patent Commandments. That way I can learn all of the American Trademark rules, how to file my grievances with the American Parliament of Trade Secrets, so that I may send the C.E.O.s of my other knife-selling competitors to debtor's prison and have them rot away in the stockades forever!! Of course, we'll have to purchase Sinner's Apologies from the American Council of Copyright Priests, but I'm sure that will be a small bureaucratic matter which you, my young associate, can take care of."

"Code..of...Commandments?" you stammer. Ludwig keeps talking.

"In particular, I have one competitor who I am quite eager to sink my teeth into.

A Mr. Harry Wolfowitz, a fellow who once worked for me has started his own knife-selling business. Why, he learned everything he knows about making knives from me!

And he KNOWS I would never make my methods or processes of knife-assembly public -- ever, for any reason!

Also, his logo looks a LOT like mine, only it is not nearly as red.

And he has produced a number of radio jingles, that also sound JUST LIKE MINE!

With your help, I will cut him DOWN with you, my new sword of American justice."

Wow. Not really sure where to begin, are you?

"But, but, where are my manners--you must be exhausted. Come, come, let me show you to your suite and we will attend to these matters in the morning. I will look over my affairs at nine and we will meet at eleven."

Your head is still swimming when the door on your suite slams shut and you realize you are alone. Except for the heads of scores of animals mounted on the walls (that's a monkey, right? Gotta be a monkey) and...AHA! A printer. An idea hits. Tonight, you'll break out your laptop and hammer out a memo, slide it under his door before nine--to give him something to look at before you meet. After all, you would like to avoid the possibly uncomfortable proposition of verbally reminding your client that he has no clue about American law.

In your memo of approximately 500 words, you are NOT going to evaluate whether he will win his Intellectual Property case (after all, you don't really have enough information) but you do want to give him some background in American intellectual property. Give him a brief overview of the four major types of intellectual property and how each of them applies to him (If you find any that DON'T apply, be sure to mention that as well.)

As with all assignments, you may simply copy and paste the text into the appropriate Canvas section when you turn it in, but either way, please avoid proprietary formats such as Microsoft Word (.doc/.docx) Please email me if you have any questions.



Backlinks: FSU Courses:LIS5411